Private Business Organization

You know we live in a world of vast online databases which can create risk for people with successful businesses. In this sense we see a desire for private commercial activities that can remain off the public radar screen.

Like many others these days, you might also prefer to operate a business anonymously…

There are opportunities when you want to invest quietly. Other times you might really like having bearer shares. Strategic advantages in negotiations might result when a specific principal remains nameless.

But with state registered organizations such as corporations and LLCs , you are always exposed in online public databases. This can handicap special situations. Only the business trust can give you anonymity, bearer shares, negotiating curtain, or all three. There are many reasons why a business owner would want a private business organization.


For example you might wish to setup a marketing company to provide services to your main company. It’s one way to redistribute expenses and tax obligations. You might set this up in another state. You would have two financial statements from which to leverage select opportunities.

Or you prefer to disguise the true owner in business negotiations. There is an acquisition target highly sensitive to certain individuals or companies. In reverse this could occur during a sale transaction. Personality conflicts do occur even when the transaction is good for everyone. Use the business trust for both offensive and defensive strategies.

Or maybe you have a niche business to remain independent of your other affairs. You and a partner invest. In the event of death the business trust continues operating by your partner. The value of his/her share is bought from the estate. Meanwhile this business avoids any personal estate planning or lack thereof. It’s a great way to do joint ventures.

If any of these examples had you used a corporation or LLC even in a state with low reporting, a breadcrumb trail exists. Plus you have bureaucratic delays, fees, and reporting obligations.


Summary

A well-designed business trust avoids state permissions and hassles. Your partners only need to know the contact person “trustee.” Disclosure of beneficiaries is totally optional. Taken one step further, a trustee could hire an agent or attorney to handle front line negotiations.

Meanwhile, your business itself remain invisible online and to outsiders.

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